The Stranger’s Long Neck

Written by: Jeff Parks

Show Time: 33 minutes 42 seconds

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Gerry McGovern has recently published The Stranger's Long Neck - How to Deliver What Your Customers Really Want.

Ireland’s Gerry McGovern shares a few of the key ideas in his recent publication The Stranger’s Long Neck – How to Deliver What Your Customers Really Want. Mr. McGovern, who will be teaching a Masterclass series in Canada on the importance of task management this November, discusses several of the key findings in his new book, including:

Trading with strangers

– The customer is a stranger. On the Web, the customer isn’t king—they’re dictator. When they come to your website, they have a small set of tasks (long neck) that really matter to them. If they can’t complete these top tasks quickly, they leave.
– There is an existential challenge going on right now between organization-centric and customer-centric thinking. Customer-centric thinking is winning.

From Long Tail to Dead Zone

– The Long Tail theory says that the Web allows you to sell more of less, that we are seeing the decline of the blockbuster and the rise of the niche.
– The Long Tail is often a Dead Zone of extremely low demand and hard to find, poor quality products.

The rise of the Long Neck

– The Web is exploding with quantity but quality is still relatively finite. Quality is the ‘long neck’; the small set of stuff that really matters to the customer.
– Understanding and managing the long neck has never been more important.
– Remember that the customer’s long neck—what really matters to the customer—is rarely the organization’s long neck —what really matters to the organization.

A secret method for understanding your customers

– A unique voting method that identifies your customers’ long neck.
– Developed over 10 years, with over 50,000 customers voting in multiple languages and countries.
– Used by the BBC, Tetra Pak, IKEA, Schlumberger, Wells Fargo, Microsoft, Cisco, OECD, Vanguard, Rolls-Royce, US Internal Revenue Service, etc.

Organization thinking versus customer thinking

– Case study that shows how car company managers think differently about how customers buy cars to how customers themselves think.
– Explanation of how to frame the task identification question.

Deliver what customers want—not what you want

– Case study of Microsoft Pinpoint, a website to help businesses find approved Microsoft IT vendors and consultants.
– What’s the top task of US small and medium businesses when it comes to IT? Security.

Measuring success: Back to basics

– Why traditional web metrics such as page views, number of visitors, etc., are often misleading
– Observation-based technique to measure online behaviour.
– The key metrics of task measurement: completion rate, disaster rate, completion time

Carrying out a task measurement

– The benefits of remote measurement
– How to run an actual measurement session

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The design behind the design
Boxes & Arrows: Since 2001, Boxes & Arrows has been a peer-written journal promoting contributors who want to provoke thinking, push limits, and teach a few things along the way.

Contribute as an editor or author, and get your ideas out there. boxesandarrows.com/about/participate

Case study of agile and UCD working together

Written by: James Kelway

Large scale websites require groups of specialists to design and develop a product that will be a commercial success. To develop a completely new site requires several teams to collaborate and this can be difficult. Particularly as different teams may be working with different methods.

This case study shows how the ComputerWeekly user experience team integrated with an agile development group. It’s important to note the methods we used do not guarantee getting the job done. People make or break any project. Finding and retaining good people is the most important ingredient for success.

The brief

In 2008, we were tasked with resurrecting a tired, old, and ineffective site. It was badly out of date, and the information architecture was decrepit to both users and search engines.

The old computerweekly.com

Our goals were:

  1. Make content visible and easy to find
  2. Create an enjoyable and valuable user experience so users would return
  3. Increase page impressions to bring in ad revenue
  4. Allow site staff to present more rich media content
  5. Give the site more personality and interactivity

The UX team created personas from ethnographic studies, online surveys, and in-depth interviews with users. The data gave us a clear idea of the user’s needs and wants. We also gleaned data from analytics that told us where users engaged and where the bounce rates were highest.

At this point the development team maintained the site with an agile process. They created features for the new site in parallel to ongoing site maintenance, but this work was outside the normal maintenance sprints. The new site was considered as an entirely new project with a separate budget and scheduled into longer term.

Boundary Spanner

As the User Experience team gathered data key team members were recruited. The diagram below shows the key team members needed to produce this large scale site, their specific concerns, and their methodologies.

Boundary Spanner

To bring these teams and disparate elements together requires a launch manager or ‘boundary spanner’. Rizal Sebastian wrote about boundary spanners in Design Issues in 20051. The boundary spanner needs to be aware of the individual issues the project faces. He need not know the detail but needs to know the cultural context of the collaborative environment.

Do people get on with each other? Are communication lines clear? Are there any personality clashes on the team. To throw developers, interface designers, business analysts, SEO experts, and usability guys together and expect them all to gel is optimistic but unlikely. It also requires those people devote all their time to just one project and that is unrealistic for a large operation where several projects are underway simultaneously.

They are more than a project manager because the user— and not the project—is at the heart of their concerns. He is responsible for delivering and continually developing a quality product. He is not just monitoring the features on a checklist. The user is at the center of all decisions on the design and development of the site. This is the only way you can ensure the user will be heard throughout product development – to employ somebody who listens to user voices and never forgets what they said. They must also ensure that SEO and business requirements are satisfied, and a well-defined strategy is in place. The boundary spanner owns and clearly communicates the vision until the whole team understands.

The boundary spanner’s strength is that they are core to the product and not a department or team known for their skillset (like a UX team for example). In many cases it is a product manager, but in this case it was the website editor who was responsible for synchronizing the teams.

Defining a process

To assist this user focused approach, the IAs produced set of deliverables that ensured the launch manager’s vision could be realized and developed.

Defining a process

Diagramming the process using a concept model engaged key stakeholders with the project by communicating the vision of what the UX team would achieve with the speed and clarity of an elevator pitch.

Information gathering

A content audit revealed broken links, redundant content, and poor usability plagued the site. It also revealed how much content became lost the second it moved from the home page. The high value research papers were impossible to find.

30 interviews, 20 ethnographic studies, and 950 responses to an online survey. created six personas. With the content audit, personas, and business objectives (what we wanted them to do on our site), we began creating the taxonomy.

Analytics

During this project we were very fortunate to work alongside the web analytics manager who provided insight into user behavior, including high bounce rates from visitors arriving from search engines. He also provided a scorecard that showed where the site failed in terms of traffic and user engagement. We knew what users were searching for, and pretty quickly could tell why they were not finding content we knew we had.

Analytics screen showing overlay on the new website

By looking at web metrics we were understood usage patterns and popular and unpopular areas of the site. The depth of information enabled us to quickly formulate a plan.

Persona driven taxonomy

As we knew our user base were industry experts, we also knew their vocabulary was related to specific areas of their markets.

The taxonomy was created by gathering as many industry sources (websites, journals, white papers), breaking these down into unique elements, and clustering these elements together to form categories for our content.

The interface used to manage the CW taxonomy

The CW taxonomy formed the basis of the navigation, content categorization, and highlighted areas for future development. It also ensured our search results served up related content in context.

Search results displayed contextual related content

We defined four main areas by looking at the community of users.

ComputerWeekly Concept

News was an obvious requirement, defined by their particular area of interest within the sector. The need for knowledge was evident, and we created an in-depth research area where case studies and white papers could be easily accessed. Tools and services, RSS, email news alerts, and newsletters reflected user needs to be kept up to date and in tune with their specialization.

Finally, although the CW community was secretive and did not divulge information amongst their peers, they were very interested in expert opinions. This need gave rise to much more integrated blog postings.

Interface development

The navigation scheme defined the elements of the page the users would use to move to other areas in the site. It clarified the naming of those items on the page.

Sitemap

We then considered the prioritization of information and content for each page, and this facilitated the production of wireframes that represented the culmination of all research, showed the interface and interactions for elements on the page, and were a working document that changed as we iterated the design.

Core and Paths

We used Are Halland’s method for ‘designing findability inside out.’2

  • Prioritize and design the core – Satisfy user goals using prioritized content and functionality.
  • Design inward paths to the core – Consider how users will arrive at the page from search engine results, facets, menus, search, RSS, aggregation, email, etc.
  • Offer relevant outward paths from the core – Ensure that the site delivers both user and business goals through clear calls to action and completion of interaction tasks.

For CW.com, we focused on the cores for the home page, a channel level homepage, and a news article page and looked at key content such as lead news story and the editor’s picks or the best from the web aggregated from external sources. The key functionality and supporting content also had to be included and prioritized on the page.

Next we considered the inward paths, which are the channels that our users are likely to utilize to arrive at the page.

Inward paths

Inward paths included search engines, blogs, bookmarks, syndication, aggregators, RSS, and email subscriptions. Considering inward paths helped us focus on the marketing channels we needed to drive users to the relevant type of page. It also focused on the keywords and themes that users are likely to use and helped us optimize pages for search and online marketing campaigns.

Finally we designed the outward paths that helped users complete online tasks for our business objectives.

Outward paths

These outward paths include:

  • Newsletter sign-up
  • Inline links to related articles to drive page consumption
  • Sharing, printing or emailing of news articles
  • Related content types such as video or audio
  • Stimulating community participation in forums or blogs
  • Contextual navigation to aggregated content or the editors best bets
  • Subscription to an RSS feed
  • Prioritizing the content

Prioritizing the Content

Once the wireframes had been approved, the content was organized so the most commercially valuable and user focused content was pushed to the top of the page. As the design went through user testing, certain elements changed, as with any iterative process, but through team collaboration, the solution remained true to the initial vision from concept to design delivery.

The development cycle

The wireframes were handed over to creative, and they began designing the interface and graphic elements. The development group released some functional elements to the old website before the relaunch.

Widget

These agile methods allowed the old site to feel the benefits of the new widgets. However, as the site changed so radically in the new design, we still had to release the site in an old style ‘big-bang’ manner. This is perhaps where agile has its problems as a methodology for new launches. It’s focus on many small releases is a great tool to implement incremental changes but not for a completely new site.

As the html flat pages were passed to the team, the SEO requirements were defined and built into the site. By the time the site launched it, had been through four major pieces of testing.

Development Timeline

A holistic solution

Providing user experience deliverables like the concept map and wireframes ensured more comprehensive requirements were delivered to the design and development team. This approach addressed marketing, editorial, sales, and business requirements next to the needs and wants of the user. The vision was aligned with an achievable delivery from the IT team that ensured we delivered the site we wanted to give the user.

The new computerweekly.com

The core IA work enabled the new site to be future-focused and versatile. The structure and design of good sites should be able to adapt to change.

User-centered design and agile can work alongside each other but what is more important is having people who can tie all the loose strands of a website design and development cycle together. The concept map, wireframes and the IA strategy document that listed the rationale behind the design decisions helped ensure the product vision was correctly communicated to the development team, so the product that was developed through their agile processes was in line with the overall product vision.

1http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/0747936053103020? cookieSet=1&journalCode=desi

2http://www.slideshare.net/aregh/core-and-paths-designing-findability-from-the-inside-and-out

Bringing User Centered Design to the Agile Environment

Written by: Anthony Colfelt

When the exciting opportunity to work in a post-bubble dot.com startup arose, I jumped to take it. I had the luxury of doing things exactly as I thought right, and for a while it was truly fantastic. I built a team with a dedicated user researcher; information architect; interaction and visual designers and we even made a guerilla usability lab and had regular test sessions.

Unfortunately, the enthusiasm I had for my new job waned after six months when an executive was appointed Head of Product Development — who insisted he knew SCRUM1 better than anybody. As the Creative Director, I deferred authority to him to develop the product as he saw fit. I had worked with SCRUM before, done training with Ken Schwaber (author1 and co-founder of the Agile Alliance) and knew a few things from experience about how to achieve some success integrating a design team within SCRUM. This required the design team to work a “Sprint” (month long iteration) ahead of the development team. But the new executive insisted that SCRUM had to be done by-the-book. Which meant, all activities had to be included within the same sprint, including design.

Requirements came from the imagination of the Head of Product Development; design was rushed and ill-conceived as a result of time pressure; development was equally rushed and hacked together, or worse, unfinished. The end of Sprint debriefing meetings reliably consisted of a dressing down of the entire team by the executives (since nobody had delivered what they’d committed to i.e. they had tried to do too much, or had not done enough). Each Sprint consisted of trying to fix the mess from the Sprint before or brushing it under the carpet and developing something unstable atop the code-garbage. Morale languished, the product stank, good staff began to leave… it was horrible.

This is an extreme example of where SCRUM went bad. I am not anti-Agile although I’ve been bitten a few times and feel trepidation when I hear someone singing its praises without having much experience with it. Over the last eight years, I’ve seen Agile badly implemented far more often than well (and yes, it can be done well, too). The result of this is mediocre product released in as much time as it would have taken a good team to release great product using a waterfall approach. In this article, I will describe Agile and attempt to illuminate a potential minefield for those who are swept up in the fervor of this development trend and want to jump in headlong. Then I will present how practices within User Centred Design (UCD) can mitigate the inherent risks of Agile and how these may be integrated within Agile development approaches.

Where did Agile come from?

Envisioned by a group of developers, Agile is an iterative development approach that takes small steps toward defining a product or service. At the end of each step, we have something built that we could release to the market if we choose to and therefore it can assure some speed to market where waterfall methods usually fail. Agile prefers to work out how to build something as we go, rather than do a waterfall style deep dive into specification and then finding out we can’t build parts of the spec for some reason e.g. a misjudgment of feasibility, misjudgment of time to build, or changing requirements.

A group of developers such as Kent Beck, Martin Fowler and Ken Schwaber got together to come up with a way to synthesize what they had discovered was the most effective ways to develop software – The Agile Alliance was born. It released a manifesto2 to describe its tenets and how it differs from waterfall methods.

Agile can be thought of as a risk-management strategy. Often developers are approached directly by a client who does not know what a user experience designer, information architect or user interface designer is. Roles such as these usually interpret what clients want and translate it to some kind of specification for developers. Without this role, it’s down to the developer to work out and build what the customer wants. Because Agile requires a lot of engagement with the client (i.e. at the end of every iteration, which can be as little as a week) it mitigates the risk of going too far toward creating something the client doesn’t want. As such, it is a coping mechanism for a client’s shifting requirements during development as they begin to articulate what they want. To quote the Agile Manifesto’s principles “Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.

Why do people rave about it?

At the heart of what makes Agile attractive is the possibility of quicker return on investment for development effort, because we can release software earlier than we would have otherwise. In the short term, this is typically borne out. In the long term it can be too, though only when the team hasn’t fallen victim to temptation (more on that later).  Agile is also good at generating momentum because the iterations act as a drumbeat to which the team marches toward manageable deadlines. The regular "push" to finish a sprint ensures that things move along swiftly. Agile is also good at avoiding feature bloat by encouraging developers to do only what is necessary to meet requirements.

Because it emphasizes face to face contact for a multidisciplinary team, Agile tends to encourage contribution from different perspectives. This is generally a positive influence on, pragmatism, innovation and speed of issue resolution. The team is empowered to make decisions as to how requirements should best be met.

The Minefield

In of itself, Agile does a good job of flexing to the winds of change. But one has to ask whether it was devised to treat a symptom of the larger cause: the business doesn’t know what it wants. While Agile enables the development team to better cope with this, it doesn’t solve the problem and in most cases creates new problems.

Mine 1: An unclear role for design

In the best cases of business approaching developers to build some software, some of those developers may have design skills. But that’s not a particularly common scenario. Many developers have also had bad experiences with designers who don’t know what they’re doing. It took a long time for the design profession to come to grips with designing for complex systems and there is still a deficit of expertise in this field. “Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project” is another principle of Agile. Where does the designer fit into the frame?

Mine 2: The requirements gathering process is not defined

Agile accommodates design activities from the perspective of a developer. It tends to shoe-horn these activities into their view of the world where requirements fall from the sky (from the business or customer who is assumed to be all-knowing) and takes for granted that they are appropriate.

According to Ken Schwaber, SCRUM intends to be a holistic management methodology and leaves space for activities other than programming to occur within the framework of iterative cycles. But when organizations adopt SCRUM, too often the good parts of a waterfall process like research and forming a high-level blueprint for the overall design become the proverbial baby thrown out with the documentation bathwater. As the Agile Manifesto says, “Working software over comprehensive documentation.”2 Many latch onto this and don’t want to do any type of documentation that might outline a vision, even if in a rudimentary sense.

Mine 3: Pressure to cut corners

Implementations of Agile that put design activities within the same iteration as they must be developed, ensure designs are achievable in code. But they also put tremendous pressure on the experience design team to ‘feed the development machine’ in time enough for them to implement their vision. This can and does lead to impulsive design. So, what’s wrong with that? Well, nothing if you’re not adhering to user centric principles which suggest you should test ideas with end users before committing them to code.

Some assert that there are plenty of examples of best-practice interfaces to copy out there. So, why reinvent the wheel? Surely we can save time that way? Sometimes they’re right, but how will we know which best-practice interface works best in context with the user’s goals, with no time to test with the user? How can we innovate by copying what already exists? Before Google reinvented internet search, other search engines assumed a status quo which behooved the user to learn how to form proper search queries. It was institutional knowledge among the other search engines that this is how searching was done and customers simply had to learn to use it. Most people’s search results were poor at best. Then Google came along and realized what is now obvious. People just want to find what they’re looking for, not learn how to drive a search engine first. I’m not suggesting the other search engines could not have done what Google did sooner, but I am pointing the finger at a mentality which meant they missed the opportunity. Interestingly, Google is not known for its designers. It’s mainly a development house, but lots of those developers can clearly put a design hat on too.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with using Agile to produce results quickly; that is, if you don’t intend to release them on your poor, unsuspecting user without some usability testing. Just don’t be fooled that this is going to save you a lot of time if you want your new product to be right, because you will have to iterate to arrive at an appropriate solution. Alan Cooper has argued that this creates a kind of ‘scar tissue’ where code that has to be changed or modified leaves a ‘scar’ that makes the foundations of the program unsound.4

Mine 4: The temptation to call it “good enough”

Invariably when we have release-ready working code at the end of each cycle, even if it’s sub-optimal, there’s a strong temptation to release it because we can. Agile condones releasing whatever we have so long as it works. Sometimes, that means doing what we can get away with, not what is ultimately best for the user. Equally, if we do decide that a feature isn’t right yet, it’s amendments get fed back into the requirements backlog where temptation strikes again. Should we spend time in our next iteration on a feature that we’ve already got a version of? Or shall we develop something new instead? Too often, the rework gets left in favor of exciting new stuff. An so on we go building a product full of features that don’t quite meet the bar.

Typical Agile Development

Mine 5: Insufficient risk-free conceptual exploration time

Iteration “zero” (i.e. a planning and design iteration prior to the first development iteration) can be used to do this and other planning activities. However, depending on how long this iteration is, the level of rigor applied to exploration may be insufficient. An argument used by some Agile practitioners asserts that a working example of a solution is the best way to validate whether it is the right one through exposure to the market. This ‘suck it and see’ approach bypasses an activity called “concepting.” Concept activities dedicate time to sketching different solutions at a high level and validating them in the rough with users before digging into detailed design or code. “Suck it and see” would have us just build it, launch it and see if it flies. This way, we’ve wasted time building something we will probably have to take apart or rebuild. The counter argument is: if it took as long to build as it would have to research and design before laying a line of code, then we break even. This statement is a stretch in practice because development itself usually does take longer than well-managed design research and conceptual exploration. Also, there has to be some level of design regardless  of which methodology is used, and this adds days to the timeline.

Mine 6: Brand Damage

Let’s just say that design and research takes the same amount of time as development for argument’s sake. In the worst case, we completely miss the mark with the non-researched and designed solution and we have to start all over again. Then we’re back to the same total duration after developing it a second time, but there’s no guarantee we’ll get the solution right the second time either. All the while we’ve repeatedly foisted a botched product design on our users and adversely affected our brand. Many companies succeed on the back of their reputation for producing consistently appropriate products and services. When a company releases a flawed product or service, then their image in the customers mind (i.e. brand) is tarnished. Brand damage takes far longer to mend than it does to make. Software creators that fall victim to the temptation of "good enough" and fail to innovate through conceptual exploration put their companies revenues at risk. In a competitive market, repeated failure to meet user needs well leads to serious brand and subsequently financial repercussions, as other companies who do get it right take the business.

Agile is good for refining, not defining.

If you have an existing product that you want to develop to the next level, then Agile in its truest sense works because you have a base upon which to improve. This means that if you know what your requirements are and these have been properly informed with user research, comparative analysis, business objectives, and analysis of what content you have and what you can technically achieve, then Agile alone can work well.

But spending money on software development without a plan of what to build is like asking a construction crew to erect a tower with no blueprint. Some level of plan is necessary to avoid a Frankenstein of each individual’s perspective on the best design solution.

User Centered Design

UCD requires iteration – design, test with users, refine, test with users again, refine… repeat till it’s right. This is where Agile and UCD can work brilliantly together. Agile really is about presuming you’ll need to change things, and that’s a good thing when it comes to refinement.

Uncovering requirements to form a strategy

User Centered Design (UCD) is not about answering requirements alone, but also includes defining requirements. When we practice UCD end-to-end, we pretend we know little. Little about what the solution to a problem should be; little about what the problem actually is because assumptions close us off to new possibilities. We prefer to allow some design research to create a viewpoint and then form a hypothesis as to what we might build. In this regard, we cross into the realm of product managers, producers, program managers, business analysts and the like, trampling toes with gay abandon and meeting resistance all around. Facing confinement to defining the boring old business need (distinct from the user or customer need), these folks would prefer we constrain our UCD work to usability testing on designs meeting the requirements they set out. They’d prefer we stick to just helping with development… and if we can do that quicker using Agile? Wahey!

Typical UCD Waterfall

Is it always appropriate to do extensive research before starting design? That’s a good question and one that Jared Spool’s Market Maturity Framework5 helps answer. Sometimes, just getting something off the ground, regardless of how precisely we meet user’s needs with it is all we can afford to do. Once we graduate out of this "Raw Iron" stage into "Checklist Battles" focused on getting the right features and then beyond, research is a core ingredient to putting our feet in the right place.

After researching what the user and business requires, we can make the “Strategy” tier of Jesse James Garret’s Elements of User Experience3which underpins everything we do during the project. Do this well, and you really shouldn’t come up with something that’s fundamentally wrong. Agile doesn’t account for this beyond a planning phase (i.e. iteration zero), which may well define a strategy of sorts. But does it really define the correct strategy? Surely, that’s created through careful consideration of three things:

  1. Empathetic qualitative research that uncovers the user’s context, needs, goals and attitudes i.e. user requirements. Cooper suggests that the customer doesn’t know what they want and advocates a role of interaction designer as requirements planner.4 This would avert building to the wrong requirements in the first place, but the time to do this must come into the development lifecycle somewhere. It involves talking to users, preferably visiting with them in their environments to create experience models and user personas.
  2. A thorough appreciation of what else in the big wide world exists in terms of products, features and technology that can be emulated somehow (not necessarily addressing a similar situation to ours).
  3. A clear articulation of the business problem, objectives, success measures and constraints. Business people sat in a room discussing what they think should be done must be informed by all these things if the right strategy is to emerge. Agile doesn’t preclude that kind of consideration, but it does not mandate it either.

JJG's Element of UE

Concept Development

If we manage to built something usable and reasonably intuitive without research or strategy, did we succeed? Most MP3 players fit this bill but none took off like the Apple iPod. Leaving interface usability aside, the iPod had a service concept behind it which included digitizing, replenishing and managing your entire music library with iTunes. This was part of the iPod concept from the outset and in combination with good marketing and design, continues to eclipse the competition over seven years later. But that concept needed to be sketched and iterated at some point. If we don’t explicitly build this into our Agile methodology, we can miss that thinking time.

Holistic Design Concept

The best of both worlds

UCD can be too documentation-heavy, isolated and risky but Agile needs help with defining requirements and concept development. How can Agile and user centric principles work together? First let’s understand what works well with Agile and not so well with user centered design. In this regard, the work that user centered design calls the ‘design’ phase can produce buckets of documentation which isn’t read, describing interfaces specified in isolation which may not be feasibly coded in the time allotted to them. So, doing detailed design is best done in conjunction with the development team and in a way where resulting interfaces can be tweaked as you go. 

Best of Both Worlds

A shared vision of the interaction fundamentals

In good software development, a conceptual interaction model that has been thought through beforehand, outlines how the user navigates the system, performs tasks and uses tools in generic terms, i.e. not each and every navigation label, task or tool but rather the interface and interaction patterns that will persist. This produces something rudimentary to test with users to see if we got the big picture right. Following this roadmap sketched on the back of research and concepting prior to development activity, ensures consistency and cohesiveness when each component is coded separately to each other later. In many cases, the concept will need iterating to accommodate lessons from the journey. But we’ll at least have some indication of direction at a macro scale. Then, when in the midst of Agile iterations working out the details alongside our developer brethren, a level of expertise and experience is required of the designer because what we design will be built before we’ve had a chance to second-guess ourselves. Domain knowledge and an understanding of interface paradigms that work is also a big help. But to build new projects from scratch without a shared vision is a mistake.

Risky interfaces that are new or significant improvements on what has been seen before, are best tackled as design-only activities in a sprint prior to when they will be developed (i.e. do involve developers, don’t try to produce code). This circumvents the pressure to deliver something before proper thought, reflection and user testing, which ensures you’re not wasting time and effort. Sometimes most of the product will be done this way and that’s fine so long as developers and designers are still working together and talking every day. The first development iterations are an important time for the developers to lay the architectural foundations based on the vision. Designers should use this time to get a jump on any high-priority tricky interfaces so the development team isn’t waiting for something meaty to start on when it comes time to build features.

Most important to success, the business needs to accept that some things won’t be right the first time around and commit to iterating them prior to release i.e. not be led into the temptation to release something that’s not right yet.

Conclusion

In summary, dogmatic attitudes about each of these approaches should be avoided if they are to be combined. Remember, Agile does not mandate how to define concepts or overall design direction, but it is a great way to execute on solid design research and well laid plans. UCD needs to be flexible enough to respond to the reality on the ground when the implementation team encounters issues that mandate a different design solution. Document only what is needed to get the message across and co-locate if at all possible, because cross-disciplinary collaboration and face to face communication are vital. Working a sprint ahead of the development team is helpful in allowing the design team enough time to test and iterate. If these rules of engagement are followed, the two approaches can work very well together.

Notes:
1. Agile Software Development with SCRUM by Ken Schwaber and Mike Beedle

2. Manifesto for Agile Software Development

3. The Elements of User Experience by Jesse James Garrett

4. Extreme Programming Vs. Interaction Design. Interview with Kent Beck and Alan Cooper

5. The Market Maturity Framework is Still Important – Jared Spool