Method Mondays: Never Stop Learning

by:   |  Posted on

Benjamin Franklin once said: “Tell me and I forget; teach me and I may remember; involve me and I learn.”

At the SAP Design & Co-Innovation Center (DCC), we frequently organize the so-called “Method Mondays,” a regular one-hour meeting series in which the team members share, practice, and test different methods.

In this article, I would like to share the five methods with you that work best for us—they’re worth trying!

Continue reading Method Mondays: Never Stop Learning

User Research With Small Business Owners: Best Practices and Considerations

by:   |  Posted on

The majority of our work at Google has involved conducting user research with small business owners: the small guys that are typically defined by governmental organizations as having 100 or fewer employees, and that make up the majority of businesses worldwide.

Given the many hurdles small businesses face, designing tools and services to help them succeed has been an immensely rewarding experience. That said, the experience has brought a long list of challenges, including those that come with small business owners being constantly on-call and strapped for time; when it comes to user research, the common response from small business owners and employees is, “Ain’t nobody got time for that!”

To help you overcome common challenges we’ve faced, here are a few tips for conducting successful qualitative user research studies with small businesses.

Continue reading User Research With Small Business Owners: Best Practices and Considerations

Unleash Your Visual Superpower!

by:   |  Posted on

From start-ups to banks, design has never been more central to business. Yet at conference after conference, I meet designers at firms talking about their struggle for influence. Why is that fabled “seat at the table” so hard to find, and how can designers get a chair?

A superhero, partially wireframed and partially illustrated.
Designers have the magical ability to visualize the future.

Designers yearn for a world where companies depend on their ideas but usually work in a world where design is just one voice. In-house designers often have to advocate for design priorities versus new features or technical change. Agency designers can create great visions that fail to be executed. Is design just a service, or can designers* lead?

*Meaning anyone who provides the vision for a product, whether it be in code, wireframes, comps, prototypes, or cocktail napkins.

Continue reading Unleash Your Visual Superpower!

How to Determine When Customer Feedback Is Actionable

by:   |  Posted on

One of the riskiest assumptions for any new product or feature is that customers actually want it.

Although product leaders can propose numerous ‘lean’ methodologies to experiment inexpensively with new concepts before fully engineering them, anything short of launching a product or feature and monitoring its performance over time in the market is, by definition, not 100% accurate. That leaves us with a dangerously wide spectrum of user research strategies, and an even wider range of opinions for determining when customer feedback is actionable.

To the dismay of product teams desiring to ‘move fast and break things,’ their counterparts in data science and research advocate a slower, more traditional approach. These proponents of caution often emphasize an evaluation of statistical signals before considering customer insights valid enough to act upon.

This dynamic has meaningful ramifications. For those who care about making data-driven business decisions, the challenge that presents itself is: How do we adhere to rigorous scientific standards in a world that demands adaptability and agility to survive? Having frequently witnessed the back-and-forth between product teams and research groups, it is clear that there is no shortage of misconceptions and miscommunication between the two. Only a thorough analysis of some critical nuances in statistics and product management can help us bridge the gap. Continue reading How to Determine When Customer Feedback Is Actionable

Your Guide to Online Research and Testing Tools

by:   |  Posted on

The success of every business depends on how the business will meet their customers’ needs. To do that, it is important to optimize your offer, the website, and your selling methods so your customer is satisfied. The fields of online marketing, conversion rate optimization, and user experience design have a wide range of online tools that can guide you through this process smoothly. Many companies use only one or two tools that they are familiar with, but that might not be enough to gather important data necessary for improvement. To help you better understand when and which tool is valuable to use, I created a framework that can help in your assessment. Once you broaden your horizons, it will be easier to choose the set of tools aligned to your business’s needs. Continue reading Your Guide to Online Research and Testing Tools

Online Surveys On a Shoestring: Tips and Tricks

by: and   |  Posted on

Design research has always been about qualitative techniques. Increasingly, our clients ask us to add a “quant part” to projects, often without much or any additional budget. Luckily for us, there are plenty of tools available to conduct online surveys, from simple ones like Google Forms and SurveyMonkey to more elaborate ones like Qualtrics and Key Survey.

Whichever tool you choose, there are certain pitfalls in conducting quantitative research on a shoestring budget. Based on our own experience, we’ve compiled a set of tips and tricks to help avoid some common ones, as well as make your online survey more effective.

We’ve organized our thoughts around three survey phases: writing questions, finding respondents, and cleaning up data.

Continue reading Online Surveys On a Shoestring: Tips and Tricks

A Beginner’s Guide to Web Site Optimization—Part 3

by:   |  Posted on

Web site optimization has become an essential capability in today’s conversion-driven web teams. In Part 1 of this series, we introduced the topic as well as discussed key goals and philosophies. In Part 2, I presented a detailed and customizable process. In this final article, we’ll cover communication planning and how to select the appropriate team and tools to do the job.

Communication

For many organizations, communicating the status of your optimization tests is an essential practice. Imagine if your team has just launched an A/B test on your company’s homepage, only to learn that another team had just released new code the previous day that had changed the homepage design entirely. Or imagine if a customer support agent was trying to help users through the website’s forgot password flow, unaware that the customer was seeing a different version due to an A/B test that your team was running.

Continue reading A Beginner’s Guide to Web Site Optimization—Part 3

Mystical Guidelines for Creating Great User Experiences

by:   |  Posted on

The Jewish Torah teaches that the Creator created our world through ten utterances–for example, “let there be light.”

The Jewish mystical tradition explains that these utterances correspond with ten stages in the process of creation. Every creative process in the world ultimately follows this progression, because it is really a part of the continual unfolding of the world itself, in which we are co-creators.

This article aims to present an overview of the mystical process of creation and principal of co-creation and to illustrate how it can guide bringing digital product ideas into reality–although it’s easy enough to see how this could translate to other products and services–in a way that ensures a great user experience, and makes our creative process more natural and outcomes more fruitful.

Continue reading Mystical Guidelines for Creating Great User Experiences

A Beginner’s Guide to Web Site Optimization—Part 2

by:   |  Posted on

In the previous article we talked about why site optimization is important and presented a few important goals and philosophies to impart on your team. I’d like to switch gears now and talk about more tactical stuff, namely, process.

Optimization process

Establishing a well-formed, formal optimization process is beneficial for the following reasons.

  1. It organizes the workflow and sets clear expectations for completion.
  2. Establishes quality control standards to reduce bugs/errors.
  3. Adds legitimacy to the whole operation so that if questioned by stakeholders, you can explain the logic behind the process.

Continue reading A Beginner’s Guide to Web Site Optimization—Part 2

Enhancing the Mind-Meld

by:   |  Posted on

Which version of the ‘suspended account’ dashboard page do you prefer?

Version A

Version A highlights the address with black text on a soft yellow background.

 

 

 

Version B

Version B does not highlight the service address.

 

 

Perhaps you don’t really care. Each one gets the job done in a clear and obvious way.

However, as the UX architect of the ‘overview’ page for a huge telecom leader, it was my job to tell the team which treatment we’d be using.

I was a freelancer with only four months tenure on this job, and in a company as large, diverse, and complex as this one, four months isn’t a very long time. There are a ton of things to learn—how their teams work, the latest visual standards, expected fidelity of wireframes, and most of all, selecting the ‘current’ interaction standards from a site with thousands of pages, many of which were culled from different companies following acquisitions or created at different points in time. Since I worked off-site, I had limited access to subject matter experts.

Continue reading Enhancing the Mind-Meld